10 Signs You’ve Got a Good Eye for Design

By February 19, 2016Haus Hacks

Good Design Eye

 

Some people are inherently blessed (or cursed, depending on your perspective) with a great eye for design. These are the folks whose brains process objects, colors and composition differently than anyone else. They see shapes, shadows and white space that are invisible to others. These are the people who can feel the rush of endorphins when witnessing a good layout or perfectly placed photo frames.

I am one of those people. I’ve learned over the years that having a “good eye” leaks into every bit of my life, beyond just pretty decor and putting a room together. I’ve shared some of my observations below and even more importantly, I’m dying to know if you feel the same way.

Here are 10 signs you’ve got a great eye (if only this were a Cosmo quiz!)

YOU’RE DAMN GOOD AT iPHONEOGRAPHY/PHOTO COMPOSITION

People with a great design eye want to make everything around them beautiful. Photos fall into this bucket, particularly the ones that get uploaded on their social media. iPhone photo editing apps also are particularly thrilling. My current favorite is ABM’s A Color Story. You may spend an embarrassing amount of time getting the perfect crop, filter and color. You could also pass as a decent photographer in a pinch.

YOU GET LOST IN THE DETAILS

A good designer knows the devil is in the details. You may or may not have spent time nudging a tabletop tchotchke back and forth until it rests in the perfect spot.

CLUTTER MAKES YOUR BRAIN EXPLODE

When you crave beautiful surroundings, ugliness can feel offensive. That’s not to say clutter isn’t existing currently in every corner of your home. Ahem.

WES ANDERSON MOVIES ARE INTENSELY SATISFYING

When you crave perfect composition, the experience of viewing a Wes Anderson flick is like a visual orgasm. It’s calming, it’s joyous, satisfying and just generally feels awesome. You “get” the appeal of his movies.

YOU’RE A PICKY BITCH (HA!)

Ugh, I’ll just say it. You can be kind of annoying. You just care so much about the aesthetics of everything you use, gift, drive, wear, etc. You may or may not prefer to provide detailed lists of items for gift occasions like birthdays and Christmases for fear something more spontaneous will not meet your difficult standards. Basically, you’re the worst. 😉 Editor’s Note: I know I’m saying “you” here, but this, and all of these for that matter, are 100% me. Minus the clothes part…

WONKY SPACING AND LAME FONTS MAKE YOU STABBY

You enjoy mentally pointing out these errors on billboards, menus, in magazines and anywhere else written words have occurred. Being stuck behind a truck plastered in Lucida Handwriting font feels especially mean.

YOU MENTALLY REARRANGE AND REDECORATE ANY SPACE YOU’RE IN

Even in great looking spaces, it’s just fun to imagine that chair there and this table over there. I mean why not? You think through colors and new art and just basically anything to run an HGTV-like episode through your mind.

YOU CARE ABOUT WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE, NOT WHAT IT SAYS

When it comes to gift wrapping, you spend a ton of time coordinating (but not matching, for gods sake!) the ribbon, tag and paper. You feel bad when you realize the gift itself took about 80% less head space.

ANYTHING OUT OF SCALE CAN BE HARD TO IGNORE

You get twitchy when art is too big and especially when lighting is too small. You’ve been known to pick out a trio of plants based on their coordinated heights and circumferences.

 Eyeball Print // Mayhem Supply

GOOD DESIGN BRINGS INTENSE JOY

And finally, you feel great joy when you experience good design. Design has the ability to make you smile. You consume interiors books or design websites like candy. You follow Instagram accounts like Christian Watson of @1924us. You buy wine just for the label. Great design is your therapy, your upper and your downer.

What about you? Did I capture it? I know so many of us get told “You’ve got a great eye!” If not on this list, how would you define your eye for design?

TGIF!

xo,

emily

 

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